Wednesday, August 15, 2007

Neglected girl with peonies and asters

I'm trying to organize my blog because I'm still too lazy to make a proper website, but want to include some older paintings, now that I have this label list on the right (and also the bottom which I can't seem to get rid of). This painting is called "Neglected girl" a portrait of a girl who lives in my neighborhood. It's a large watercolor on Arches Hot Press (from a roll) 40x45". It's too large to frame and send away for a show, but sits neglected in my studio.

6 comments:

  1. I would like to make out with you.

    This is BEAUTIFUL Dee.


    MAC

    ReplyDelete
  2. This is so haunting, and the size is mind-boggling. Wish I could see it in person (that sounds funny suddenly - is it my person or the painting's?)

    ReplyDelete
  3. this is an amazing painting; too beautiful to be neglected.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Haunting is a good word for this painting. The size of the child in comparison to the plants makes her seem small and lost. Did she pose for you? Does the paper that size fit your drawing table or easel or do you have to work in sections with the rest rolled up? Beautiful and eery!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thank you all for your comments! And thank you for checking the blog out.
    MM, you are hilarious. Jana, The child did pose for me and I took alot of pictures of her, but I worked from several photos. Getting a kid to pose for longer than 5 minutes, I find impossible. My paper is from an Arches Hot Press roll, 300 gsm, so it's pretty heavy and I try to get the roll out of it quick. I cut a couple of pieces of heavy cardboard (from the local hardware store) to fit the size and I clip the paper to that with bulldog clips. Then I start painting on it without wetting the paper entirely. (I wet sections while I work on them).
    When I need to work on a section flat, it's alot of leaning over, but as they say, "suffering is for artists".

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thanks for the explanation. Joseph Raffael (josephraffael dot com) works on large watercolors too, but he leaves them rolled up and just works on the little exposed section at a time. I like to be able to see the whole painting so that would bother me, I think.

    ReplyDelete

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.